The Art & Animation of Jeremiah Schiek

I am an artist, animator, and story artist currently seeking work as such in the greater Los Angeles area.
Okay.  Last one for tonight.  I’m having fun laying these out, and believe me, there’s lots more where these came from.  I have a couple of poems hanging around in my notebooks that I’m going to transcribe and illustrate, and then I think I’ll have enough to release a short ePub for any interested parties.
Thanks for all of the likes and reblogs.  If things go well, I’ll have maybe one or two more short ones to post tomorrow.  
Good night for now.
J. Schiek

Okay.  Last one for tonight.  I’m having fun laying these out, and believe me, there’s lots more where these came from.  I have a couple of poems hanging around in my notebooks that I’m going to transcribe and illustrate, and then I think I’ll have enough to release a short ePub for any interested parties.

Thanks for all of the likes and reblogs.  If things go well, I’ll have maybe one or two more short ones to post tomorrow.  

Good night for now.

J. Schiek

Aaaaannnd…One more.  I think this one is much less likely to piss people off.
J. Schiek

Aaaaannnd…One more.  I think this one is much less likely to piss people off.

J. Schiek

Back in 2003, I began work on an ongoing book of poems entitled, Adverse Verses.  Over the years, I have continued to add to it, a bit here and a bit there.  Most recently, I brought the volume in to work to show it to a fresh audience and get the opinions of some of my coworkers.  My thought has always been to take some scans of the pen & ink/watercolor illustrations therein and attempt to get the thing published, either by a publisher, or on my own in the form of an ePub, or possibly some second cousin to the old vanity presses I used to hate so much.

This is one of my favorite pieces from the book, a little ditty called "The Little Boy With Leprosy."  I don’t mean to be insensitive to the condition, though if I was, I doubt I would have done this as a poem, and would probably have gone with the more politically correct name for this affliction, which is Hansen’s Disease.  Whether you approve or not, here it is.  And I can’t guarantee there won’t be more like it.

As always, thanks for stopping by.

J. Schiek

While I was on vacation, starting July 8th, I discovered a blank steno notebook and began writing a story that occurred to me in that instant. Over two weeks later, I’ve got over 130 handwritten pages, and it’s still going strong. The finished output, I hope, will be a fun and fulfilling ghost story for children, and adults. The drawing is of two of the ghost characters seated at a booth in AJ’s diner in the fictional Bentley, California. I will of course keep you posted as things unfold.

As always, thanks for stopping by!

J. Schiek

While I was on vacation, starting July 8th, I discovered a blank steno notebook and began writing a story that occurred to me in that instant. Over two weeks later, I’ve got over 130 handwritten pages, and it’s still going strong. The finished output, I hope, will be a fun and fulfilling ghost story for children, and adults. The drawing is of two of the ghost characters seated at a booth in AJ’s diner in the fictional Bentley, California. I will of course keep you posted as things unfold.

As always, thanks for stopping by!

J. Schiek

Hard at work. 

J. Schiek

Hard at work.

J. Schiek

jedtheflyinghead:

Here is a one page story entitled, My Dinner With The Diarrheacher.  There are a lot more vignettes to come!  But I need to go to bed now, or I’ll be in trouble.
Good night!
J. Schiek

The above description is entirely accurate. At least two more longer short pieces on the way. J. Schiek

jedtheflyinghead:

Here is a one page story entitled, My Dinner With The Diarrheacher.  There are a lot more vignettes to come!  But I need to go to bed now, or I’ll be in trouble.

Good night!

J. Schiek

The above description is entirely accurate. At least two more longer short pieces on the way.

J. Schiek

Save Your Work

I just wrote out the first four pages of an apocryphal Iron Man story that has been stewing in my brain for a couple of years, and just as I go to save the document, the application crashed. There’s something to be said for pen and paper. Not going to get burned again. As for the project, stay tuned.

J. Schiek

Caught this idea shortly after arriving at work this morning. I’ll be posting a cleaned up version soon, but in case I get sidetracked and, well, don’t actually clean it up, I thought I’d at least convey the idea in some shape or fashion. 

J. Schiek

Caught this idea shortly after arriving at work this morning. I’ll be posting a cleaned up version soon, but in case I get sidetracked and, well, don’t actually clean it up, I thought I’d at least convey the idea in some shape or fashion.

J. Schiek

OPEN CASTING CALL FOR REVOLUTION

I’m at it again, and this time I did a little math:  If everyone of the approximately 318,000,000 Americans living in this country was to stuff one of the business reply envelopes with nonsense (assuming you don’t want the high balance/low interest rates the credit card companies are trucking you) and send in one a week for a year—assuming each envelope has approximately 55 cents in postage—that would generate just over 9 billion dollars in revenue for the USPS. Now, I could be wrong, I am an art major after all and not a statistician, but it’s awfully fun to do, it socks it to the American Debt Emperors and helps save one of the better institutions. All it requires is that you get inundated with credit card applications week after week, that you have pen, paper, a random thought, and then just a little saliva to seal the envelope. Oh. And it requires you have the bravery and fortitude of personal character to drop your little randoms in the mailbox. If it never gets sent, it never gets spent. 

Thanks for bearing with me. 

Your uncle who is not really your uncle,

J. Schiek

PS: That’s if you send one. I do three to five a week. It’s easy. And you can, too.

OPEN CASTING CALL FOR REVOLUTION

I’m at it again, and this time I did a little math: If everyone of the approximately 318,000,000 Americans living in this country was to stuff one of the business reply envelopes with nonsense (assuming you don’t want the high balance/low interest rates the credit card companies are trucking you) and send in one a week for a year—assuming each envelope has approximately 55 cents in postage—that would generate just over 9 billion dollars in revenue for the USPS. Now, I could be wrong, I am an art major after all and not a statistician, but it’s awfully fun to do, it socks it to the American Debt Emperors and helps save one of the better institutions. All it requires is that you get inundated with credit card applications week after week, that you have pen, paper, a random thought, and then just a little saliva to seal the envelope. Oh. And it requires you have the bravery and fortitude of personal character to drop your little randoms in the mailbox. If it never gets sent, it never gets spent.

Thanks for bearing with me.

Your uncle who is not really your uncle,

J. Schiek

PS: That’s if you send one. I do three to five a week. It’s easy. And you can, too.

Drawing

To draw attention to yourself, you must first draw.